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Mrathon training newbie - which plan?!

5 watchers
Jun 2012
12:38pm, 29 Jun 2012
668 posts
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Curly45
You cerntainly seem to be lucky in that you dont degrade as you go up the distances - your half time predicts a 22:39 5k which is close to what you already have.

Thats good as it suggests you have a good stamina base.

No need to settle on a target right now though. I'd go with the mileage option too, I think furman is a risk for people who have niggles as it involves a lot of speedwork. Marathons are mainly about the miles. Time on feet and lots of it, but slow and steady. You do not need to run 10k in an hour for it to be a good training run. You shouldnt be pushing hard in most runs, 1 day a week speedwork is sufficient as you will make huge fitness gains from the long runs (which are a type of hard session in themselves). Build up slowly to running 3-4 times a week and then I would look at a 12-16 week plan after that if you have time (how many weeks till the race?).

Consistent consistency is the key.

Good luck.
Jun 2012
12:42pm, 29 Jun 2012
5 posts
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JuliaD
It's exactly 16 weeks and 2 days.
Right - best get started this weekend then.
:)
Thank you btw. This is all really encouraging.
Jun 2012
12:50pm, 29 Jun 2012
6064 posts
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SpicedApple
Welcome to Fetch, Julia! :-)

Sounds like you've got a very good running and fitness base on which to build your longer runs. And it sounds as if you were a very disciplined person and good at sticking to schedules.

I'm not (also work very irregular hours), which is why I liked this plan as it gives you the freedom to juggle sessions around: jogscotland.safety.ed.ac.uk However, I haven't even managed to stick to this one, but just followed its progression of long runs as I wanted to make sure not to injure myself by doing too much too soon. Around those long runs, I just did shorter sessions when I had the time - less than advised by most plans, so I know there's something I should do better next time!
Jun 2012
1:05pm, 29 Jun 2012
6 posts
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JuliaD
Okay that's great. Something that allows for a bit of juggling will help me feel less anxious if I have a bad week! I like the mileage increase on this too.
Jun 2012
1:19pm, 29 Jun 2012
10123 posts
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Naomi P
Welcome to Fetch :-)

You can create your own plan, the general principles are all the same

- Increase your mileage by c.5% each week, no more than 10%

- Cut back week every 4th week to rest and consolidate training gains
- One or two speedwork / strength sessions a week (intervals, hills, tempo, progressive)
- One long slow run with the last 5 LSRs totaling 100+ miles (eg. 18, 20, 20, 22, 22)
- Complementary x-training is fine notwithstanding the specificity comment above, you're training to run, not to bike or whatever
- Strength work / pilates / yoga is a good addition to address niggles, weak areas or tight muscles
- Think about a couple of races to see where your speed endurance is so you can revise your goal time

It's easiest to work backwards from your race date, slotting in races, work travel, real life commitments etc etc. You shouldn't need to do doubles really, until you're over 50 miles / week and then it's not necessary. If you do, make sure one of the runs is easy.

Good luck!
Jun 2012
1:22pm, 29 Jun 2012
7 posts
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JuliaD
Fab thank you!
I'm going to create myself a big geeky excel spreadsheet and see how all the plans compare and then use this advice to tailor something for me.
Feeling less intimidated now
:-D
Jun 2012
1:30pm, 29 Jun 2012
10124 posts
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Naomi P
Don't get intimidated, all these people come up with complicated plans to flog books. It's not complicated, especially when you're not looking to win medals.

One tip for Amsterdam, get in your starting pen really really early, it's horrifically crowded. I was boxed in for a good 15 km, worst crowding I've ever seen, even worse than London and Paris.
Jun 2012
1:34pm, 29 Jun 2012
669 posts
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Curly45
Yep the half is like that too! Hone your elbows you may need them

I loved the videos on the course though :)
Jun 2012
1:43pm, 29 Jun 2012
8 posts
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JuliaD
Right good pointer thank you.
I did much the same for Bath, moved as far forward as I could and got a really nice non-crowded run as a result.
I guess that's a reason not to hitch too much on getting a time though - if a crowd pulls you back you could risk hurting yourself trying to catch up later?
Jun 2012
1:57pm, 29 Jun 2012
10127 posts
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Naomi P
Yeah, to be honest, I'd say forget about the time for your first marathon, the primary aim is to complete it, enjoy it and not be crippled by it. Times can come later. Having the experience of what it's really like helps enormously too.

That said, you're well capable of sub 3:45 off your half times. But I wouldn't worry about it on your first. If you do, then have 3 goals - one you're happy with, say 4:20, one you'd be really pleased with like sub 4 and one you'd be over the moon with, say sub 3:50 (GFA time after all).

About This Thread

Maintained by JuliaD
Hi
I'm looking for some suggestions and advice as to how to build a marathon plan. There are lots...

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