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10K Training

4 watchers
May 2014
7:57am, 19 May 2014
654 posts
  • 0
Not so Lazytoad!
Hi Guys

Some advice please :) Im not at a point where I can run 5k relatively comfortably and at a reasonable pace. I am however still finding 10k very very tough. Im signed up for one in September so have plenty of time to improve and train but don't know where to start! I have downloaded the Bridge to 10k app, has anyone used this with good results? Should I be running 10k in training to get used to it? Should I be upping my mileage a little but not quite that far?

Any advice gratefully received thanks :)
May 2014
8:33am, 19 May 2014
1890 posts
  • 0
HappyTimes
For many cases the simple and basic answer is run more and that is true in your own situation I would say. If you enjoy running and it is a hobby you are happy to commit some time to then you will notice a huge difference by running more regularly and some longer runs too (assuming you currently log all your training). Build up gradually over period of time but there is plenty scope to both run more often and further, both of which will help greatly in you 10k race.
I have not used the plan you have noted, but assume it would advise similar.
Yes build up to have at least one run per week of 10k or further and depending on his much you want to achieve in time I would suggest most runs you do would be further than 10k.
Keep the pace comfortable as the danger for many is to run at too fast a pace initially. There is plenty time for adding specific fast training sessions later.
Have a mix of runs and routes you do to keep from it possibly getting boring.
Most importantly enjoy it :-)
May 2014
9:25am, 19 May 2014
3874 posts
  • 0
Autumnleaves
When I started running it was to train for a 10k. I didn't follow a plan - I just ran about 3 times a week building up the distance, I only ran 10k itself once before the day itself. I enjoyed the first race - since I didn't really care about my time. I did find it challenging. I stuckto that sort of training for years. It wasn't until I started regularly running further than 6 miles for my longest run of the week that I improved my times. So I would say for you it depends what your goal is in September. If it is just get round without too much difficulty then if you build up a long run to 6, you should be fine. If you want to race it, then I would run further, and use parkrun to practise your goal race pace.
May 2014
9:50am, 19 May 2014
655 posts
  • 0
Not so Lazytoad!
Happy - Thank you for your response, I do currently log all my runs :) Your advice makes sense to me and I do have the scope to go further in my local area. I have also been thinking about changing at work as I drive through some beautiful areas so contemplated parking up having a bit of a run and then driving home.

Autumn Thank you for your response, I guess I really want to be able to cover all of it running therefore fingers crossed giving me a PB, sounds like I need to start going further more regularly :)
May 2014
9:14pm, 20 May 2014
6 posts
  • 0
Komodo
Yes run longer but also do what Autumnleaves suggests and do a Parkrun preferably one with hills!
May 2014
8:20am, 21 May 2014
658 posts
  • 0
Not so Lazytoad!
Komodo Thank you :) Hills eeeewwwwww
May 2014
2:40pm, 21 May 2014
1895 posts
  • 0
HappyTimes
Hills are one option to build strength and improve running form. However if you do not like that idea no problem really. Running regularly and building distance for some time to come should be your priorities. Specific sessions are icing on cake. When time comes if you do not want to do hills you can do interval training and or weights training to improve form and strength instead.
May 2014
3:29pm, 21 May 2014
659 posts
  • 0
Not so Lazytoad!
Happy Times - Thank you, that's music to my ears :)
May 2014
4:26pm, 21 May 2014
7288 posts
  • 0
Schnecke
Somebody (I think it was Hal Higdon) said that hill reps are 'intervals in disguise' - i.e. running hill reps, which will inevitably be at a slower pace than running on the flat, are a good alternative to running fast intervals. Interval training is good too, of course, and worth doing to develop your fast twitch muscles. What I would be quite careful about is getting tempted into doing too much too soon - as a fairly new runner, I injured my Achilles tendon by overenthusiastic gradient running on a treadmill, so all 'new' kinds of training (whether that's hills, intervals or whatever) should be introduced gradually and carefully to minimise the chances of getting injured.

And, if you are able to, I would agree that training at over 10K distance would be a good idea if you have a particular time in mind for your 10K race. Again, increase the distance (or time) that you run very gradually, and make sure you build in some 'recovery' weeks where you reduce your training to allow your body to adapt and grow stronger.

Good luck with the 10K - let us know how you get on! :-)
May 2014
9:39pm, 21 May 2014
660 posts
  • 0
Not so Lazytoad!
Schnecke thank you for your reply, that's really useful advice :) I will heed your warnings re too much too soon and increase steadily. I will of course report back on my progress :)

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Maintained by Nutso Lazytoad!
Hi Guys

Some advice please :) Im not at a point where I can run 5k relatively comfortably and at ...
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