Heart Rate Monitor Training for the Compleat Fetchie

Summary

This article contains all things to do with heart rate monitor training. It will concentrate on the teachings of John L Parker in his book Heart Rate Monitor Training for the Compleat Idiot.

This article is owned by Mykey

Introduction

I feel this article is long over due. Many of us keep being asked about heart rate monitor training and we have all the information in various threads.
This article is an attempt to organise the collective information we have on Fetch and to help us from repeating ourselves over and over again.
Of course none of us mind talking about it and giving help and advice but a central repository is a far more efficient way of conveying the concept of this extremely effective training method.
First of all I will attempt to explain the basic steps in order to employ heart rate monitor training.
The explanation is followed by many links to all the threads we have created on Fetch and a link to a search that will bring up many more threads related to the phrase "Heart Rate".
Please feel free to contribute to this article; all that I ask is that we try our best to keep the information in here in an orderly fashion so it will remain useful to all.
Thankyou
IanM

Getting Started

Simply follow the steps detailed below...

Find your Maximum Heart Rate (MHR)

Several methods exist for this probably the most effective is to use the hill running technique as described below:
1. Warm up by jogging / gently running for 1 - 2 miles or 10 to 20 minutes.
2. Find a steep hill of at least 120 metres.
3. Run up the hill hard, note heart rate near top.
4. repeat step 3 four to six times.
5. take the highest heart rate reading which you should see at the end of your last repeat. Use this as your Maximum Heart Rate.
6. Remember when you take the reading near the top of the hill you should be pushing VERY hard and you should note the HIGHEST reading you see.
7. Your highest heart rate might be recorded a little after the end of your repeat.

Find your Resting Heart Rate (RHR)

Probably the best method is to keep your heart rate monitor and strap in a handy position by the bed.
First thing in the morning when you awake, put the strap on and check your heart rate (wet the strap with electrode gel or saliva).
Take the average of three mornings to get the best result.
Some people find that they see a lower RHR later in the day after a period of relaxation.
Make sure you monitor this every few weeks.
An elevated reading can be a good indicator of the onset of illness or over tiredness and can be a good way of knowing when to either go easy on your training or even refrain from running until you recover.

Work out your "Recovery Ceiling" beats per minute

In the Parker book the Recovery Ceiling is defined as seventy percent or below of the Working Heart Rate (WHR).
Use the formula below substituting the values for your MAXHR and Resting HR as appropriate.
Recovery Ceiling WHR = (MHR-RHR)x0.70+RHR
Example: 185 Max HR, 47 Resting HR
Recovery Ceiling BPM = (185-47)x0.70 + 47 = 143.6BPM

Work out your "Lactate Threshold" beats per minute

In the Parker book the Lactate Threshold is defined as eighty five percent or or above of the working heart rate.
Use the formula below substituting the values for your MAXHR and Resting HR as appropriate.
Lactate Threshold WHR = (MHR-RHR)x0.85+RHR
Example: 185 Max HR, 47 Resting HR
Lactate Threshold BPM = (185-47)x0.85 + 47 = 164.3.6BPM

Start training

From personal experience I would advise anyone embarking on heart rate monitor training to run their first two to three weeks as easy runs just to get used to running slowly and help to start building a good base.
The more experienced athletes out there may think this is odd but it will work and it takes patience. To start with the pace will feel laughably slow and far too easy. Be prepared to have to walk up some hills to keep the heart rate low enough.
Aim to keep the heart rate within a few beats of recovery ceiling for the whole run or at very least 90 odd percent of it. Those having trouble keeping the heart rate THAT low may benefit from training at 5 to 8 BPM higher than the calculations for the first few weeks.
If you get really fed up with it, go for a nice fast run. Just make sure that you do a nice recovery ceiling run for every hard session you do.
It will take probably three months to start working but eventually you will be able to run a reasonable pace still at the recovery ceiling heart rate.
The book explains how this happens and exactly what happens to your physiology far more competently than I can.
For hard sessions you should aim to push the heart rate up to AT LEAST the lactate threshold or higher after a sensible warm up of course and cool down after.
For more information either fmail me, post on the Heart Rate thread (the one with most posts) or read the book.

Buy/steal/borrow the book

For a long time hard to get, new edition out for a while, currently available for £9.43 & this item Delivered FREE in the UK with Super Saver Delivery. Link (roll over me to see where I go) (17 August 2010)

Resources

Finding Min & Max Heart Rate:

Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Resting heart rate
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Maximum heart rate
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Working Out Max Heart Rate?
Link (roll over me to see where I go) >Low Heart Rate Training
Link (roll over me to see where I go) >WORKING HEART RATE - MARATHON TRAINING

Precise Advice and Discussion

I feel it only fair to point out that Hendo has also done some sterling work regarding threads of discussion related to heart rate training too. This thread on Runner's World was perhaps what got me interested in the technique before I joined Fetcheveryone.
Link (roll over me to see where I go)
*Thanks Hendo*
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > WORKING HEART RATE - MARATHON TRAINING
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart Rate Monitor Training - Tips & Advice
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > HRM training
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart rate
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart rate training - advice for a beginner required
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart Rate %

Supporting Information

Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Search For "Heart Rate" On Fetch
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Books on HR training
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Not another HRM thread!
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > HRM's
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart Rate advice
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart Rate
Link (roll over me to see where I go) > Heart Rate

Recent Updates User Comments
Nov 2010 Snellers spelling!
Aug 2010 Always last Update to availabilty / price of book
Aug 2010 GlennR Added point 7 to the MHR section.
Jul 2010 BanjoBax not sure what happened last time I checked but parker book available again.
May 2010 BanjoBax updated book availability as looks like hard to get again :(
Dec 2009 BanjoBax update of book availability since new edition out.
Nov 2009 fetcheveryone
Nov 2009 fetcheveryone Article formatting
Feb 2009 ninemins Heart Rate Monitor Training - Tips & Advice - returned no hits http://www.fetcheveryone.com/viewtopic.php?id=1809 > Heart Rate Monitor Training - Tips & Advice Does the content still exist - how can I find it?
Feb 2009 ninemins Are the link IDs out of date or is it just me
jonstrong Spike52 Lorne Tikka Ronners Punxs tubbyrunner Mick the slug Fizz :-) Duchess PhilB MG1 .B. RunnyBunny Old Croc dsmed4 JJ1 Stepford Wife Gary Cardnell Plissken Winniefree Brighouse Boy Ultracat lunaman GimmeMedals
Fetcheveryone is a publication of Hearst Magazines UK which is the trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd, 72 Broadwick St, London, W1F 9EP.
Registered in England 112955. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2014.