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Polarized training

1 lurker | 62 watchers
3 Apr
3:33pm, 3 Apr 2017
10772 posts
Chrisull
Here's the killer question - should walking time be counted as part of your training (ie walking for a mile at least kind of thing). If not, why not?

Last December - walking up a hill at average HR was 125.

Today running over a hilly 5 miler at 9.45 pace , my average HR was 129.

Therefore little difference... Big question as it makes a lot of difference to training miles. I walk 2 miles a day with the dog....
J2R
3 Apr
5:56pm, 3 Apr 2017
346 posts
J2R
I posted an answer to this over in the 'Heart rate' thread.
7 Apr
10:16pm, 7 Apr 2017
33312 posts
Hills of Death (HOD)
Finally got my Matt F 80/20 book reading it with interest and nodding away

About This Thread

Polarised training is a form of training that places emphasis on the two extremes of intensity. There is a large amount of low intensity training (comfortably below lactate threshold) and an appreciable minority of high intensity training (above LT).

Polarised training does also include some training near lactate threshold, but the amount of threshold training is modest, in contrast to the relatively high proportion of threshold running that is popular among some recreational runners.

Polarised training is not new. It has been used for many years by many elites and some recreational runners. However, it has attracted great interest in recent years for two reasons.

First, detailed reviews of the training of many elite endurance athletes confirms that they employ a polarised approach (typically 80% low intensity, 10% threshold and 10% high intensity. )

Secondly, several scientific studies have demonstrated that for well trained athletes who have reached a plateau of performance, polarised training produces greater gains in fitness and performance, than other forms of training such as threshold training on the one hand, or high volume, low intensity training on the other.

Much of the this evidence was reviewed by Stephen Seiler in a lecture delivered in Paris in 2013 .
Link (roll over me to see where I go)

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