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Ian Williams - Fetcheveryone

Heart rate

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SPR
8 Dec
1:39pm, 8 Dec 2018
27323 posts
SPR
I just start easy and so HR starts low.
SPR
8 Dec
1:40pm, 8 Dec 2018
27324 posts
SPR
Obviously that refers to training. For races, warm up is a must.
8 Dec
1:42pm, 8 Dec 2018
13733 posts
Bazoaxe
You missed the point SPR. The true HR is actually low, but an erroneous reading gives a higher HR for about a mile.
SPR
8 Dec
1:48pm, 8 Dec 2018
27325 posts
SPR
Baz - I'm referring to splanchnic shunt which was discussed after rather than erroneous readings. What I'm saying is if you start easy, there's not a sudden high demand on your heart, so likely the overshoot to deal with start of activity will be less.
J2R
8 Dec
2:18pm, 8 Dec 2018
1622 posts
J2R
I never get excessively high HR readings in the first mile when I neglect to warm up and find it very tough going - the opposite, in fact. I feel that my heart rate is remaining lower than it should be, and I have conjectured that this might mean I'm tending to run into oxygen debt. If I warm up properly beforehand (and simply running a couple of miles at an easy pace does this fine, without the need for any strides or anything), my HR climbs much more quickly up to the typical HR I will have in the latter stages of the race.

I don't know whether there is any medical basis for this conjecture - one might assume that the heart will successfully pump out whatever blood is required for the effort level. But I wonder whether it's reasonable to see the heart itself as a muscle which needs to be warmed up before it operates at peak efficiency, and maybe it gets more sluggish at doing so as we get older?
8 Dec
3:36pm, 8 Dec 2018
1106 posts
Daz Love
Thanks all... It was relatively easy pace and seems odd it’s just started as getting colder.

Will keep an eye
8 Dec
3:47pm, 8 Dec 2018
65597 posts
Gobi
Mine plays up sometimes in the first 15 mins
8 Dec
3:48pm, 8 Dec 2018
65598 posts
Gobi
Ps. Inhave the hrm tri and although battery life is ok the strap is dying. I shall post pictures if people like.

Prefer the older device where you could replace the strap.
J2R
8 Dec
4:02pm, 8 Dec 2018
1623 posts
J2R
Yes, definitely wouldn't want an HRM where you couldn't replace the strap. I tend to think of HRM straps in the same way as you would tyres on a car, items with a limited lifespan which need replacing from time to time.
8 Dec
4:56pm, 8 Dec 2018
65599 posts
Gobi


Not sure how well you can see but split and bubbles on the strap

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About This Thread

Everything you need to know about training with a heart rate monitor. Remember the motto "I can maintain a fast pace over the race distance because I am an Endurance God". Mind the trap door....

Gobi lurks here, but for his advice you must first speak his name. Ask and you shall receive.

A quote:

"The area between the top of the aerobic threshold and anaerobic threshold is somewhat of a no mans land of fitness. It is a mix of aerobic and anaerobic states. For the amount of effort the athlete puts forth, not a whole lot of fitness is produced. It does not train the aerobic or anaerobic energy system to a high degree. This area does have its place in training; it is just not in base season. Unfortunately this area is where I find a lot of athletes spending the majority of their seasons, which retards aerobic development. The athletes heart rate shoots up to this zone with little power or speed being produced when it gets there." Matt Russ, US International Coach

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