Not running for a long time - how do you deal with it?

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Jun 2014
1:56pm, 30 Jun 2014
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Frobester
So, after being diagnosed with tibial tendonitis, and being prescribed orthotic shoe insert, I think I'm probably settling in for some sort of long haul recovery here, when I'd originally thought (yes, based on approximately zero medical knowledge) "a few weeks and I'd be right".

Short of turning my attention to other sports, like biking, swimming, tiddlywinks and shove ha'penny, does anyone who's on the long-term bench have any "coping strategies"? I'm starting to get irritated when I see other people out running, mainly for being out running at all, sometimes for looking damn fit, but mainly just for being out running. I realise I shouldn't - but at this stage I haven't converted my irritation into shouted exhortations to "go and run somewhere else". Yet.

Thanks!
p^2
Jul 2014
1:24am, 1 Jul 2014
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p^2
Short answer: now you can focus on biomechanical inefficiency.

Long answer: So far, I've been going to the gym three times a week to do some remedial work on my very immobile shoulders. Which I wouldn't have known about had I not signed up for a good slow focussed Pilates course, which has highlighted just how many compromises and workarounds I generally use. At my age (and yours) it is a good investment.

Also you should do some non-competitive non-sporting physical activity: walk or cycle to or from work, daily or less frequently, without pressure. Or walk the dog, or anything to remind your body that you are still active. And it gives you a chance to dissociate. Solvitur ambulando: huffingtonpost.com
Jul 2014
7:34am, 1 Jul 2014
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Le Tûp Derby
Frobes, can you go out for a decent walk?
Jul 2014
8:10am, 1 Jul 2014
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Autumnleaves
I've had 2 enforced breaks, one was 3 months - at that point I was still a gym member so I was able to do other CV stuff that didn't aggravate my Achilles, plus I went to a few classes. For me it was as much about replacing the endorphin high as anything. In 2012 I hurt my back, I thought I'd be out for months but in fact it was weeks, although the first few weeks were very walk/run. I did lots of core work which helped me feel I was in control of the situation.
Jul 2014
10:02am, 1 Jul 2014
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macca53
you only need to look at my training activity over the past three years to see that I'm in the same position - and I'm *much* older than you. Three bits of significant surgery have broken me - and I suspect another one may be on the horizon which will definitely be the end of my running activity. I now almost resigned to having to swim and/or bike - but surprisingly Mrs M has recently expressed an interest in doing some more strenuous walking than usual so that's got some potential for development too.....

Believe you will be back soon no matter how tiny the positive steps are - but be prepared to accept that you may never be as fast as you want to be but occasionally you may be faster than you expect to be (copyright V'rap:))
Jul 2014
11:16am, 1 Jul 2014
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tazdevil
I've suffered 2 breaks in same leg over past 3 yrs and as recovery time went on I started walking more and swimming took over big time...runs and spinning were off limits...it was very hard at first but you have look at other forms of keeping active...keep chin up and positive thoughts..

good luck on recovery
Jul 2014
11:17am, 1 Jul 2014
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Frobester
Thanks everyone so far - I'll digest and cogitate on your responses later. In the meantime, for the avoidance of any confusion, I own a working cocker spaniel, aged 2, and therefore I am out walking at least twice a day!
Jul 2014
11:21am, 1 Jul 2014
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Velociraptor
I'm quite capable of doing virtually no exercise for several months at a stretch, and finding something else to throw myself into instead.
Jul 2014
11:33am, 1 Jul 2014
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Le Tûp Derby
A year and counting here :-O
Jul 2014
12:53pm, 1 Jul 2014
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southcoastclaret
I think it really depends on the individual.

One course of action might be to throw yourself into some "give back" time to the sport - volunteer at parkrun, marshall at local races, take on a role in your local running club, or get a coaching qualification. Actively supporting and encouraging other runners may help you to feel more positively about them.

Alternatively you may just need to step away from the sport entirely.

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