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Grammar pedants - help please.

91 watchers
13 Apr
1:05pm, 13 Apr 2021
22267 posts
  • 0
Dvorak
Notbremse. No, but it is. Also Notfall - I spent quite a bit of time being confused by that.
13 Apr
1:56pm, 13 Apr 2021
74625 posts
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swittle
[A break in shooting? Or a shooting brake? ;) ]
13 Apr
3:43pm, 13 Apr 2021
3335 posts
  • 0
Evangel
A few days ago I read a booklet about 'Complementary Medicine', written by somebody we used to know. A heading of one section reads, 'ARE THEY ALL NEW AGE PRACTISES?'. On the opposite page, we read, 'COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE PRACTISES'. There are also many repetitions of this error in the main text. When people have asked me which is which, I have usually pointed to the spelling of 'advice' and 'advise' as a helpful guide, (even though the pronunciation is different).

For more sources of every possible error in the English language, just read some of the posts on 'Fetch'!
13 Apr
3:50pm, 13 Apr 2021
46340 posts
  • 0
LindsD
Not = emergency
13 Apr
3:50pm, 13 Apr 2021
13983 posts
  • 0
larkim
After 48 years on the planet, I finally got the chance (which I took!) to correct my father on a "less" or "fewer" usage. He took it in good grace :-)
13 Apr
3:50pm, 13 Apr 2021
46341 posts
  • 0
LindsD
Or actually also "need"
13 Apr
4:05pm, 13 Apr 2021
7755 posts
  • 0
sallykate
Similar in Dutch: nood (pronounced "node") is emergency, hence nooduitgang = emergency exit, and nodig = required, or needed.
13 Apr
5:31pm, 13 Apr 2021
20854 posts
  • 0
ChrisHB
I recall that when we first encountered Notfall, our teacher explained it very carefully as if he had much experience of people tripping up over it.

The other thing about Not is that it is one of two words considered to rhyme with Gott, the other being Spott (mockery). Hence any German hymnwriter who has the misfortune to end a line with Gott is forced to choose between Not & Spott / need & mockery for the end of the next line.
13 Apr
5:57pm, 13 Apr 2021
13745 posts
  • 0
Badger
That's amusing. I know a Professor Spott (who is German). Always seems quite serious.
13 Apr
7:29pm, 13 Apr 2021
22272 posts
  • 0
Dvorak
A Dalmatian is presumably not known as a spotti Hund.

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