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Atrial Fibrilation

1 lurker | 21 watchers
Nov 2019
12:51pm, 7 Nov 2019
1519 posts
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Flatlander
Mrs. J. in the context of AF, catheter ablation is the same as cardiac ablation.

GregP, from what you write, you may have paroxysmal AF (intermittent and doesn't last long) so this usually doesn't need treatment apart from medication. My AF was persistent (wasn't going to go away by itself) so that is why I needed intervention (I may have previously had paroxysmal AF without noticing it).

Anti coagulants are usually needed in AF because the chaotic contractions of the heart mean that blood pools in the heart chambers and clots may form which can disperse to other parts of the body (causing strokes etc.)
Nov 2019
12:53pm, 7 Nov 2019
116014 posts
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GregP
Thanks Flatters-Landers - that's both helpful and reassuring.
Nov 2019
1:09pm, 7 Nov 2019
29130 posts
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Mrs Jigs (Luverlylegs)
Thank you for confirming my understanding Flatlander. My son underwent this procedure today.
Nov 2019
4:56pm, 7 Nov 2019
27116 posts
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macca 53
I had paroxsysmal (treated with flecainide and a beta blocker) before my ablations when the episodes were becoming more frequent and longer lasting.
Nov 2019
5:17pm, 7 Nov 2019
1448 posts
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Heinzster
Aspirin doesn't reduce clot risk in AF but does increase the risk of a bleed. Even paroxysmal AF can greatly increase clot (and therefore stroke) risk, only a few minutes of AF can produce a clot. NOAC treatment is generally offered. If it isn't I would ask why.
Nov 2019
5:23pm, 7 Nov 2019
25937 posts
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HellsBells
That's my understanding too Heinzster, aspirin stopped being recommended several years ago. I was also taught that stroke risk was increased when flipping in and out of AF, so anticoagulants are more important in paroxysmal than sustained
R4R
Nov 2019
9:21pm, 7 Nov 2019
3134 posts
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R4R
Like macca, I had paroxsysmal. Treated by medication (flecainide) for several years before getting increasingly prolonged, so underwent PVI in 2012.
After 6 months or so, episodes had stopped, and I don't think I've had one since, although I don't train as much or as as I used to
Nov 2019
9:39pm, 7 Nov 2019
1520 posts
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Flatlander
That's interesting Heinzster and HB. Does that mean that paroxysmal AF not noticed by a patient could be a cause of unexplained strokes? Do such stroke victims get given ECGs?
Nov 2019
8:05am, 8 Nov 2019
27117 posts
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macca 53
I can’t recall now the figures my cardiologist told me, but yes Flatlander as I understand it most people with AF only find out they have AF when they present with something else, because it’s largely undetectable by the patient. That was also his reasoning for the (apparently) higher incidence of AF in affletes like us - we become aware of it because we are monitoring (literally) our hearts.
Nov 2019
8:08am, 8 Nov 2019
27118 posts
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macca 53
Oh and btw I was on warfarin gas anti-coagulant therapy, which in my case seemed to control it well apart from monthly INR tests.

About This Thread

Maintained by Da Big Guy
Anyone had atrial fibrilation? How bad, How often, how long does it take to go, what causes it for y...

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